BadNewsBarnes666's Blog

All Bad News all the time

Archive for the ‘India’ Category

China About To Cut Another Chunk Off Of India

Posted by Larry Barnes on May 21, 2010

Manipur’s lifeline, two key highways linking this north-east Indian state to the rest of the country have been blocked by supporters of Maoist, Thuingaleng Muivah, who heads the NSCN (IM). “I’m trying to buy some rice,” says Sobita Devi Maibam. “But they’re telling us stocks are low because of the blockade. And prices are sky-high now.” From BBC reports.

Muivah stayed in China for a fairly long time, his first trip, between 1967 and 1973. He holds that “this is the way towards a better society. We run our institutions based on revolutionary principles and the people’s desires – although in many ways there are shortcomings and weaknesses”.

Muivah, has been barred from his village located inside Manipur because the government there fears he will stir up ethnic passions, a vital tool to the Maoist insurgency. “Chairman Mao’s words are gospel truth” he has said. Confusing his recruits and the outside world are essential to his gaining personal power.

Muivah has said “we are talking with the government of India. As long as the political problem is approached politically, there is nothing to fear. But when one lacks the will that is required to bring about the solution, it is most unfortunate”. This is no doubt a show of confidence in his ability to achieve capitulation from the Indian government and an extension of the “fight, talk, fight” philosophy. “War will be a continuation of politics by other means.”

“The adversaries would do their best to exploit the situation, to stamp out the revolution. But the people do not easily abandon the cause. Both the masses and the revolutionary cadre cannot afford to perish”, he has said, proving his devotion to Maoist dogma. With the financial backing from Maoist China “power with which rulers unscrupulously suppress the right of the people must be crushed.”

“Nehru insisted on recognizing China’s “rights” in Tibet despite the pleas of the Tibetans, along with many Indians, that he weigh in against this new form of Chinese hegemony. His appeasement of the “New China” came back to haunt him in 1959 when Mao, having disposed of the Dalai Lama and his followers, began building military roads right up to the existing Indian-Tibetan border, and then ordered troops to cross over into India.

Chairman Mao initially supported Maoist-style Communist parties in Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, Burma, India and Thailand. The Malaysian Communist Party launched an armed rebellion, which the Chairman supported until it became clear that the guerrillas were losing. Mao was encouraging indigenous Communist movements among the “bridge compatriots” of Southeast Asia.” ( http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/individualProfile.asp?indid=2073 )

“Over the years, the NSCN-IM has developed extensive linkages both within India and outside, and has also been receiving substantial assistance from neighbouring countries. The form of this assistance ranges from supply of arms and ammunition and other logistical support, to provision of safe havens, camping and training facilities. Till 1971, the US was a major provider of arms, finance and intelligence. The erstwhile East Pakistan had also provided assured supplies of money and arms, Till the late 1980s, China also provided support to the organisation. Pakistan’s Inter Services Intelligence (ISI) now provides a large component of finance, arms and logistic support to the NSCN-IM.

The [NSCN-IM] has linkages with the Naga groups operating in Myanmar, and drug trafficking from Myanmar is a major source of income.” ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSCN#Linkages )

Portions of an interview with Thuingaleng Muivah:

KY: How do you view the present situation vis-à-vis the pre-ceasefire years?

TM: Nothing can be taken as a certainty. Yes, we are talking with the government of India. As long as the political problem is approached politically, there is nothing to fear. But when one lacks the will that is required to bring about the solution, it is most unfortunate. It would be as dangerous as taking comfort in an illusion. War will be a continuation of politics by other means.

The adversaries would do their best to exploit the situation, to stamp out the revolution. But the people do not easily abandon the cause. Both the masses and the revolutionary cadre cannot afford to perish. The only way available to them to survive is to rectify their mistakes and regenerate themselves together as a people. India has left no stone unturned to wipe out the Nagas and the force of their nationalism. The policy they are now resorting to is to wear us out by protracted design. But the Nagas know that their salvation does not lie in India.

Whether in war or peace, every organisation and human being must have ethics, for without ethics human being become worse than animals, which is against the law of creation. It hurts the conscience of society and people. In any war, killing innocent people is totally unjust, the greatest crime against humanity. For example, right from the inception of our resistance movement we have rarely used anti-personnel mines, because innocent people often become victims.

KY: How would you justify choosing to articulate the Nagas’ desire through the language of violence and military action?

TM: The Nagas could understand the danger of being suppressed. To the Nagas, freedom is more important than anything else. Freedom, for the Nagas, means that they themselves would decide their fate. This is the most decisive issue for every nation. When that freedom is given up, the Nagas know that their rights of existence are gone forever.

The BBC reports that Thuingaleng Muivah heads the NSCN (IM), and fails to report on the the NSCN-K led by S S Khaplang. They also fail to point out NSCM (IM) has only existed since they split in April of 1988. The BBC still claims that they were carrying out India’s longest-running insurgency until a ceasefire in 1997.

“The National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN) was formed on January 31, 1980 by Isak Chisi Swu, Thuingaleng Muivah and S.S. Khaplang opposing the ‘Shillong Accord’ signed by the then NNC (Naga National Council) with the [Indian government]. Later, differences surfaced within the outfit over the issue of commencing a dialogue process with the Indian Government and on April 30, 1988, the NSCN split into two factions, namely the NSCN-K led by S S Khaplang, and the NSCN-IM, led by Isak Chisi Swu and Thuingaleng Muivah.” ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSCN#Formation )

The BBC can claim “It is not an easy job in a region which is not only racked with separatist violence but is also a frontier to south-east Asia, where India is competing for influence with China”, and ignore the hegemony of Maoist China. The world needs to be reminded of Mao’s map of China and the fact that China’s current government is seeking military expansion and has not repudiated Mao’s dream.

“But with the growing influence of China in Burma and other parts of Asia, India has reason to worry. This is after all critical to its strategic defense”. “If the north-east becomes a separate region, the Indian heartland is completely exposed.” BBC

If, as the BBC reports, “The north-east has often felt politically and culturally cut-off from India, untouched by the country’s economic boom”, and a “massive military presence”, has “furthered”, a “sense of alienation.” The world needs to ensure that the goals of communism will be not furthered by expounding upon the claims and not the roots of “revolutionary” movements.

This view of the current situation is in response to a BBC article (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8694107.stm) Road blockade chokes Indian state’s lifeline, which is just, in the majority, an attempt to mitigate the damage done by the recent death of 35 Indians murdered in an attack on a civilian bus.

Posted in China, India, Military, Obama | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Chairman Mao Murders Thirty People In India

Posted by Larry Barnes on May 18, 2010

It is evident that the evil Mao has spawned is alive and well after a land mine attack in Chhattisgarh state killed more than 30 people. The civilians killed in were not accidental victims of an errant attack. This is the tactics that Mao learned, used and espoused.

Most of those killed in Monday’s blast, which destroyed a bus, were civilians, and the government is under pressure to take a tougher line against the rebels.

The Indian government is thought to want to include the use of air power to fight the Maoists. Thousands have died in the their decades-long fight against humanity and the Indian state.

In this incident it appears that Maoist supporters saw that armed police were on board the bus, and an attack was organized extremely quickly. It is clearly an attack against a target that violates the law of necessity and proportionality. Anything from the BBC, no. But the Indian government says it also demonstrates their barbarity.

“I took to the cabinet committee the case for a larger mandate. I was given a limited mandate. Now we will go back to the cabinet committee to revisit that mandate,” Mr Chidambaram told the NDTV channel.

He said the chief ministers of some of the worst-affected states had asked for air power to be used against the rebels reports the BBC, a measure that the government has so far refused to sanction.

“Operation Green Hunt” began last October, it involves 50,000 members of the police and militia troops and is taking place across five states in India: West Bengal, Jharkhand, Bihar, Orissa and Chhattisgarh.

Monday’s attack on the bus in Chhattisgarh state’s Dantewada district has prompted widespread anger and the BBC is doing its best to stamp it out. As the BBC points out, the Maoists have warned civilian bus companies not to transport local police or members of the security forces. This, in the eyes of the BBC, and hopefully yours, makes the Maoists less evil.

The Maoists support has been slipping away from the rebels, particularly after last month’s attack.

Manmohan Singh described by Prime Minister the Maoist insurgency as the country’s biggest internal security threat. The communist inspired BBC would be described by me as number two. Delhi have accept that there is a need to tackle the root causes of the rebellion, such as poverty and the absence of effective local government, but not yet the media that throws gas on the fire.

Chairman Mao initially supported Maoist-style Communist parties in Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, Burma, India and Thailand. The Malaysian Communist Party launched an armed rebellion, which the Chairman supported until it became clear that the guerrillas were losing. At the Bandung Conference, a conciliatory Zhou Enlai declared that those Chinese who adopted another nationality should be good citizens of the countries they joined. But this pious statement did not completely allay suspicions that Mao was encouraging indigenous Communist movements among the “bridge compatriots” of Southeast Asia.

Nehru insisted on recognizing China’s “rights” in Tibet despite the pleas of the Tibetans, along with many Indians, that he weighed in against this new form of Chinese hegemony. His appeasement of the “New China” came back to haunt him in 1959 when Mao, having disposed of the Dalai Lama and his followers, began building military roads right up to the existing Indian-Tibetan border, and then, in early September, ordered troops to cross over into India.

Mao’s aggression took Nehru completely by surprise, which is perhaps less a consequence of his naiveté than of Zhou Enlai’s sophisticated sales pitch about the two countries being fellow victims of the Western imperial powers. The Chinese premier had first visited him in New Delhi in April 1954, stopping over on his way back to China from the signing the Geneva peace accord on Indochina. Zhou played the second international stratagem to the hilt, portraying the PRC as a country with impeccable anti-colonialist, anti-imperialist credentials, a country that was a natural member of the Third World club. Nehru agreed.

An Indian delegation at the U.N. had argued on behalf of Communist China’s admission. On that very day that the Chairman sent Chinese forces pouring across the border into India. As Nehru pondered Mao’s perfidy, PLA troops continued their march southward, seizing two important mountain passes that guard approaches to Sikkim and India.

Professor John K. Fairbank of Harvard, for example, wrote in the Atlantic Monthly in 1957 that the regime’s controls over “prices, person and minds, mobilizing of patriotic youth, collectivizing the rural economy and pushing of industrialization” were “remarkable successes” and great achievements.” Not a word about the Maoist terrors that now held the Chinese people in a grip of fear, nor about Mao’s larger aims.

Posted in Afghanistan, China, India, Iran, Iraq, Mao, Military, Obama, Pakistan, Terror | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Fascist Chinese Seek World Control

Posted by Larry Barnes on May 10, 2010

YouTube – Fascist Chinese Seek World Control.

China Military Power Report released

World peace and development are faced with multiple difficulties and challenges. Struggles for strategic
resources, strategic locations and strategic dominance have intensified.
Chinas National Defense in 2008

http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/pdfs/…

http://windsofchange.net/archives/005…
Neo-Fascism & China’s Future
By Joe Katzman on August 27, 2004 4:25 AM

In my Normblog interview, I was asked about threats to the future peace and stability of the world. Islamofascism was #1, of course, but I also spent a bit of time explaining my worries about one possible future for China: a future of state capitalism under dictatorial control, a strong need for external resources to fuel that economy, carefully fostered xenophobia, a legacy of belief in the racial superiority of Chinese peoples, a major demographic problem in an excess of young males, and the meme that China is being cheated of its rightful place in the world. Germany’s history in the 20th century teaches us what this combination portends.

See also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3Hbcl…

And: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YAEbQ…

Fascism has found adherents in all countries. Its essentially vague and emotional nature facilitates the development of unique national varieties, whose leaders often deny indignantly that they are fascists at all. In its dictatorial methods and in its use of brutal intimidation of the opposition by the militia and the secret police, fascism does not greatly distinguish itself from other despotic and totalitarian regimes. There are particular similarities with the Communist regime in the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin. However, unlike Communism, fascism abhors the idea of a classless society and sees desirable order only in a state in which each class has its distinct place and function. Representation by classes (i.e., capital, labor, farmers, and professionals) is substituted for representation by parties, and the corporative state is a part of fascist dogma.

Fascism, especially in its early stages, is obliged to be antitheoretical and frankly opportunistic in order to appeal to many diverse groups. Nevertheless, a few key concepts are basic to it. First and most important is the glorification of the state and the total subordination of the individual to it. The state is defined as an organic whole into which individuals must be absorbed for their own and the state’s benefit. This “total state” is absolute in its methods and unlimited by law in its control and direction of its citizens.

A second ruling concept of fascism is embodied in the theory of social Darwinism. The doctrine of survival of the fittest and the necessity of struggle for life is applied by fascists to the life of a nation-state. Peaceful, complacent nations are seen as doomed to fall before more dynamic ones, making struggle and aggressive militarism a leading characteristic of the fascist state. Imperialism is the logical outcome of this dogma.

Another element of fascism is its elitism. Salvation from rule by the mob and the destruction of the existing social order can be effected only by an authoritarian leader who embodies the highest ideals of the nation.

This is the Chinese response to the report:

I know that “essentially vague and emotional nature” is the picture evoked by the CCTV response.

Posted in China, Economy, illuminati, India, Iran, Joint Chiefs Of Staff, Military, Navy, Obama, Pakistan, Pentagon, Pirates, Terror, United Nations, US Forces | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Obama Presented With The Opportunity To Insult An Allie: India

Posted by Larry Barnes on March 20, 2010

India has saod it will ask the Obama Administration for permission to question the Chicago man who has pleaded guilty to scouting targets for attacks on the city of Mumbai, India. India must be unaware of the tendency Obama to shield terrorist from justice by political wrangling.

Headley pleaded guilty on 12 counts in a Chicago court. Home Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram statement that India welcomed the guilty plea could be seen as an understanding that Obama’s AG is not competent to secure a quick guilty verdict.

Headley chose his plea to avoid the death penalty or extradition. India having seen this evidence of the Obama Administration gutlessness, must have decided to embarrass it self with the interview request. We will continue to press our request for access to interrogate Headley,” Mr Chidambaram told reporters in the Indian capital, Delhi.

“There are many more questions that we want to ask, much more information that we wish to get,” he added. India’s request and its ability to get useful information has been killed, like its citizens, by relieving Headley of the prospect of finale retribution for his acts. Mr Chidambaram said he had seen a copy of the plea agreement and that Mr Headley could face life imprisonment which would satisfy India. This leads to my question, why would India seek public embarrassment with no hope of answers to its questions?

Posted in India, Obama, Pakistan, Terror | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S.-Indian Armies Wrap Up Historic Exercise

Posted by Larry Barnes on October 28, 2009

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service
CAMP BUNDELA, India, Oct. 28, 2009 – With a massive display of firepower and teamwork, the U.S. and Indian armies finished their largest joint military exercise to date yesterday.

lrs_091024-D-1852B-1267

About 250 U.S. soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, 14th Cavalry Squadron, based out of Hawaii brought 17 of their Stryker combat vehicles and paired with the Indian army’s 7th Mechanized Infantry Battalion here at one of India’s premier military training sites.

Since Oct. 12, the two armies have swapped soldiers, shared equipment and traded war stories, officials said.

“That’s the most important aspect of this whole exercise — getting to know each other, getting to appreciate our cultures, and working together as a team,” said Army Lt. Gen. Benjamin R. Mixon, the commander of U.S. Army forces in the Pacific.

Mixon and a host of Indian army generals traveled here Oct. 26 to view a culminating demonstration of firepower that offered up both the conventional battlefield power of the Indian’s T-90 tanks with the high-technology precision of the U.S. military’s tank killer, the Javelin.

Both infantries brought out their vehicles and weapons for a live-fire demonstration, and Indian helicopters dropped soldiers from both armies to join in the live-fire assault.

This was the largest deployment of the Stryker vehicle outside of deployments for war, and the Indian soldiers were eager to get a peek at its firepower and technical capabilities. The only restrictions were that the Indian soldiers could not drive the Strykers or use the high-tech communications network that manages the crew’s weapons.

Both armies traded firing their big guns on the range, and U.S. soldiers rode alongside their Indian counterparts in their infantry vehicle. A handful of Indian troops were allowed to fire the Javelin, a treat that many U.S. troops in the infantry have yet to experience.

The training started two weeks ago with simple handshakes among the soldiers and a display of the each army’s equipment. It quickly escalated to the two nations’ armies working side by side on complex maneuvers, some scenarios strongly resembling the types of joint operations troops see in Iraq and Afghanistan.

As opposed to joint military operations in which U.S. technology and firepower clearly positions itself as the superior force, the Indian army proved itself a capable force, teaching as much as it was learning, U.S. commanders on the ground said. The Indian army has long been fighting an insurgency, and brought new tactics to the table.

“The Indian army is a professional military force,” Mixon said. “I would be comfortable going with the Indian army anywhere, any time.”

The 2-14th returned from Iraq six months ago, and is slated to return in about nine months. This exercise is a ramp-up in training, as the unit prepares for larger pre-deployment training exercises such as those at the National Training Facility in California.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

But while the U.S. troops leave this week with training under their belts that prepares them for their next deployment, the value of the training was integrating successfully with the Indian army.

“At the end of the day, the important part of the exercise is the future cooperation and the understanding between the two armies,” Mixon said.

The United States has sought to increase its military relations with India in recent years. Until now, most of the exercises in that effort have been smaller troop exchanges or command-level exercises using only computer-driven scenarios. This is the first time that a large number of boots on the ground have acted out those scenarios together.

“This is all about training with the Indian army, to enhance relationships so that we gain a greater understanding of each other. That’s really what this is all about,” the general said.

U.S. Pacific Command works regularly with other militaries on large-scale military operations, especially maritime.

Yudh Abhyas started in 2004 as the first conventional army-to-army training in India since 1962. In 2005, U.S. troops came to train at India’s counter-insurgency and jungle warfare school. In 2006, Indian troops went to Hawaii for training, and in 2007, troops traveled to Alaska. The exercise shifted back to Hawaii last year.

“We want to be able to work together as militaries,” Mixon said. “By us training together and getting to know each other, if there were a contingency, we would be better prepared to respond to that contingency. You cannot do that training here at the last minute.”

Posted in Afghanistan, India, Military, Obama, Pakistan | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: